A & I Poetry Challenge: July 2018


Our July Challenge:

Turn on the radio to any channel.

Write a poem inspired by the first thing you hear (lyrics to a song, a commercial, etc.)

Post it to your blog, prior to July 26, and include the Tag A and I Poetry Challengeso that Amanda and I, (the hosts) can find your poem and comment.

Leave a comment on this post to indicate your interest in participation.

The A and I Poetry Writing Challenge has been running for several months and the poetic community grows each month.

(Click Here for a sample) 

When formulating your poem, please keep in Mind:

The prompt is merely a suggestion if you need help getting started with ideas.

You may, write about whatever you choose and still tag our A and I Poetry Challenge so that other readers can find your poetry post.

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

A and I Poetry Challenge Instructions  HERE

Read my Submission in my follow up post, tomorrow, together with links to the Poetry participants from the month of June, but first here are some Poetry Writing Tips:

Poetry Writing Tips from Allison

  •  Don’t overdo prepositions, adjectives, and adverbs.
  •  Use action verbs, not “to be” verbs
  •  Help the reader interact with the poem.
  •  Help the reader relate by focusing on particular objects, not generalizing a type of object (whether the object is physical, mental, or spiritual).
  •  Find unusual subject matter — a teapot, a shelf, a wall
  •   Keep a notebook with you at all times so you can write whenever (and wherever) inspiration strikes.
  • Sometimes it is a scratching secret, wanting out, wanting to be in the world but held back by fear. Either way there is something about the act of sharing with the world, however big or small that world might be, that completes the creative process.
  • If you want to capture a feeling that you experienced, then you don’t need these tips. Just write whatever feels right. Only you experienced the feeling that you want to express, so only you will know whether your poem succeeds.

Happy writing

Ineke

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A & I Poetry Challenge. End of June


Poetry Challenge Entries for June Closing Soon

It is the final week of the Monthly Poetry Challenge for June.

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Write a poem based on your own theme or the prompt given below, and post using the tag A and I Poetry Challenge.  You have until Friday to be included in this months round up of entries.

The prompt is outlined below but perhaps you have another theme to present?

Leave a comment here so that Ineke and I can easily find your poem for this month.

Find instructions for joining in HERE


June Prompt

Write a poem about something small that is only 5 lines long. Write the same poem again and try to use concrete words.

Discuss which version you like best and why.

The prompt is merely a suggestion if you need help getting started with ideas.

You may of course, write about whatever you choose and still tag our A and I Poetry Challenge so that other readers can find your poetry post.

If you have the skill to read or write in Afrikaans, you can find Ineke’s contribution here:

https://scrapydo2.wordpress.com/2018/06/04/a-i-poesie-uitdaging-junie/A and I Poetry Challenge

 

Amand and Ineke  – A and I Poetry Challenge

(I copied and pasted this from Amanda’s reminder)

Bea visits Ouma!


Bea visited me this morning. It was the first time since they moved out of this house. She still could not really walk around when they moved. Today she first walked with her mum, to see the cows across the road.

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She came inside and had a look outside on the deck while her parents looked around.

Time to go home and she did not really want to go. She went back, going up the three steps, onto the deck and then jumping off into Daddies’ arms.

A and I Poetry Challenge no 3: May


 

The A and I Poetry challenge is jointly hosted by Amanda and Ineke and is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets.

The challenge runs March to October 2018.  Each month we will share tips, offer a monthly poetry prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see this month’s poetry writing tips and April’s entrant links.

I am co-hosting this challenge with Amanda from https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/ – we met here on WordPress.

If you wish to read the story of how we met click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

A and I Poetry Challenge Guidelines

  • For General instructions on joining in click the Poetry Challenge Page.
  • Everyone is very welcome to enter and age is no barrier.
  • Write any kind of poem that you like, (the below prompt for this month, is merely a suggestion); it can be fun or serious.
  • Write in any language that pleases you, and note that it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge I, from Scrapydo2, will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on my blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her
  • Add the A an I Poetry badge if you so wish. (optional)
  • Publish the poem on your blog before the 27th day of that month adding the tag A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Once you publish your blog post, please leave a comment here on this page and also at Amanda’s blog listing the URL link to YOUR poem.  [Others can then find their way to your post and we build a supportive community of poets who visit, read and comment on other’s poetry.

**If you don’t post the link to our blogs with your poetry, it is really hard for us to find you and include a link back to your blog, for the next month’s challenge.


 

 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

 

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 



Poetry Challenge Entrants for April:




Poetry Tips

  • Formatting – Tools to help you format your poems on your blog, including how to add extra lines in your post without WordPress expunging them on posting, can be found here

 

  • Live your poem. When you write, imagine you are a participant in your poem. Look around. See what’s happening. Feel the texture of the sticky pine cone. Feel how difficult it is to pull your fingers apart to type afterwards. Listen to the sounds around you. A robin? A whippoorwill? A Tasmanian devil? Smell your panic. Taste the dryness on your tongue, the thin salt. Activate all your senses. Galway Kinnell once said, “If you’re going to write about a frog, become that frog. Inhabit frogness.” 
  • Don’t think too much, just write it down.
    Ray Bradbury once said, “Throw yourself off a cliff and build your wings on the way down.” Don’t think too much about what I’m going to write. Let the poem create itself. Discover what you are doing in the process of doing it. It evolves as you put pen to paper.

 

 

  •  Incorporate poetry devices
    What else can make your poetry shine like the summer sun? Imagery, metaphors, and the symbolism-to name just a few poetry devices-are subtle ways to improve your poetry. By adding rhyme, irony, or tone to your work, you create a phoenix from a dead piece of paper.
    Readers enjoy poetry with meaning, that has a beat or an easy flow, and can be secretive but not beyond their understanding. Great poets know exactly how to incorporate the many elements of poetry into their work.
    Research the many poetry devices (others include simile, figurative language, synecdoche, allegories, and musical devices) and begin practising with them in your own poetry. Write a poem with a theme you enjoy but base it on irony or a metaphor. Continue to practice each device and work them all into different poems to experience each one’s effect.
    You can find many examples and ways to use poetry devices by reading books on the subject or doing a simple search online. Study and learn each device, because you never know when one might work perfectly for what you are trying to write. And by diversifying your abilities, you make yourself a much better writer.
    In a nutshell:
  1. Use poetry devices to give your work substance.
  2. Readers enjoy reading poetry with inner meaning or special attributes.
  3. It takes practice, hard work, and dedication to master devices like Symbolism, Imagery, or Rhyme.
  4. Finding out about each poetry device is easy; just search online or at your local bookstore or library.
[Source Credit: https://forum.rhymezone.com/articles/884-5-tips-for-writing-better-poetry-how-to-jumpstart-your-writing-by-john-bon]

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month.

Don’t forget to link back to this post, on your poetry submission post, and leave a link and comment here so Amanda, Ineke and others can find your post.

Have fun!

`Ineke and Amanda

Baby Talk: Dinner and a horse ride!


The family is back from their Christmas outing.

We had a lovely meal together.

While waiting for our food

Dad gave Bea her meal.

Then we had fun!

We went to Grandma’s place.

Guess what I did?

HORSERIDING

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I was so wild from the start Grandma could not get some good photos.

Only in full motion.

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If you take a good look you can also see grandma’s squeaky Snoopy dog in front of me riding with me on the horse! This doggy is still my Dad’s toy. He still remembers it.

School Stories: Before School Care


Every morning Monday to Friday

before school starts at

7:30 am

Little ones (5-year-old) build

fences and cages for

dragons.

They love to play and build.

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Bigger girls make bracelets and other items like

fruit, hotdogs or bees using

loom bands.

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Hard at work

Image result for loom bands nz

 

 Some are playing games on iPad

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On the road! Sunday Photo Fiction – September 6th 2015


Interested in joining in the fun of fiction writing? Visit

https://sundayphotofictioner.wordpress.com/2015/09/06/sunday-photo-fiction-september-6th-2015/

Big-rig

Big-rig

On the road!

“Wow, here comes a truck!” Sarah lifted her skirt up, showing her well shaped tanned leg.

Sarah needed to hurry up and get herself a ride to the next town.

“I just have to keep on flashing my legs,” she thought.”I really need to get a ride soon. My fiance won’t wait if I am not there on time.”

The big truck stopped next to Sarah in a cloud of dust. Out jumped the well-built, good looking young driver.

“Hello, gorgeous! You wanna lift? Where you wanna go?”

He opened the truck’s door.

Sarah started to explain: “I’m on my way  …..”

The truck driver grabbed her and pushed her onto the front seat. A pair of other hands pulled her inside. In a state of shock Sarah thought:”What are they going to do to me? I never should have flashed my legs!”

Too late girly!

SPF

Thanks for reading!