Textures: The daily Post Photo Challenge


Ben Huberman at:

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/textures/

says: Photography is a primarily visual medium, but we can experience it with more than one sense. This week, focus on the tactile element of the objects you shoot, whether it’s one distinct quality — softness, smoothness, graininess, or any other texture you find interesting — or a combination of several within one frame.

Raffled rope

IMG_6901

Textured buildings

Rhino horn texture

DSC03932

Beautiful Kowhai Tree: Springtime.


Kōwhai are small, woody legume trees in the genus Sophora native to New Zealand. There are eight species, Sophora microphylla andS. tetraptera being the most recognised as large trees. Their natural habitat is beside streams and on the edges of forest, in lowland or mountain open areas.[1] Kōwhai trees grow throughout the country and are a common feature in New Zealand gardens. Outside of New Zealand, kōwhai tend to be restricted to mild temperate maritime climates.

The word kōwhai is also used in the Māori language as a colour term, because of the yellow colour of the flowers.[2]

Despite having no official status as such,[3] the blooms of the kōwhai are widely regarded as being New Zealand’s national flower.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C5%8Dwhai

My photos:

THE NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS MAGAZINE, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 7 (NOVEMBER 1, 1928)

THE GOLDEN KOWHAI — A FOLK TALE OF THE MAORI

(By JAMES COWAN.)

Long ago, in the back country of the Rotorua Lakes region, I heard a Maori explanation of the Kowhai’s singular habit of flowering on bare and leafless branches.

The Miraculous Flowering.

On the shore of one of these lakes, said the arboreal fairy tale, there sat one day in the misty long ago a young Maori man and girl. The man pressed his love on the beautiful Kotiro; he sought her for his wife, but the maid laughed—Maori maids are as “kittle cattle” as their Pakeha sisters—and said she’d see; she would wait; she would not accept his love until her suitor—who was an Ariki of high rank and a tohunga too—performed some great and unexampled deed before she would become his wife. She would wed none but a famous man, a man whose exploits no one could outdo.

The lover accepted the challenge. “You shall see what I can do,” he said, He turned to the tree under which they were sitting. It was a Kowhai. The time was about our Pakeha month of August. The tree was quite bare of both flower and leaf.

To Please a Maiden’s Eyes.

“I shall,” said the young tohunga, “cause this tree to spring into flower before your eyes.” With those words he put forth all his occult powers, the command of mind over matter, which had been taught him by the wise men in the sacred house of instruction. He recited in quick tense tones his magic prayers. And, all in a moment, a miracle! All at once the tree burst forth into a blaze of blossom. All its naked boughs were covered in a breath with golden hanging flowers.

The amazed girl saw, and was conquered. No man surely could rival that wonder-feat of her priestly lover.

And ever since that day, says the Maori, the Kowhai has flowered on leafless branches, a sign and a reminder of the ancient miracle.

(The Scarlet Cianthus, which is called by the Maoris the Kowhai-ngutu-kaka, or “Parrot’s beak,” because of the shape of its very rich flowers, does not carry any special association with native folk-talk. It is the yellow Kowhai that is heard in tradition and song. “Te ura o te Kowhai” (the glow of the Kowhai) is a common expression, and the Maori was as quick as any Pakeha artist or poet to appreciate the beauty of the drooping clusters of golden blossom reflected on the glossy waters of a lake or harbour, or in a gliding river. There is a mystical “Kowhai-turanga ora,” or “Tree of Life,” in the classic legendry of the Waikato people; it is used symbolically in song and speech to-day in allusion to powers and authorities—the British Crown was thus referred to in an address I remember—to which the Maoris look for help and life.)

http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Gov03_07Rail-t1-body-d12.html

Stairs in the Mango tree: Monday Finish the Story – Sept 21, 2015


© 2015, Barbara W. Beacham

Finish the story begins with:  “She lived in a mango tree.”

Frank’s last words before he passed on. Little Sue kept on wondering where the mango tree could be? A mango tree big enough to house a whole home? Impossible but, maybe there could be a tree like that.

Little Sue started asking around. One day she, met an old tramp on the way home from work. He begged for something to eat. Sue invited him in and gave him bacon and eggs.

The tramp started by explaining that Frank and he had been best mates for years. Suddenly the mango tree and  lovely lady came to mind. Both men were  in love with her. She always disappeared after meeting one of them.

One day both men, decided to follow her. They did not know of each other’s movements until they both stood in front of a huge tree with stairs leading up the tree. They looked at each other. Both hurried up the stairs. Reaching the top there was nothing. Just branches and leaves. “How could the lovely lady just disappear in thin air?” the old tramp sobbed.

Mondays Finish the Story

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/09/21/mondays-finish-the-story-sept-21st-2015/

Photo 101, Day Eighteen : Edge and alignment


Michelle says:

Today’s Tip: To make sure your edge packs a punch, use a photo editing tool to check the alignment and adjust the image, if needed, so that your edge is perfectly straight.

Original photo

oignal
oignal

Aligned

straightened
straightened
original
original
straightened
straightened

 

Five Photos, Five stories Day 4 : Totara Park street and Kowhai tree


DAY 4

KOWHAI Tree

My first photo taken of this lovely tree.

100_3985

This is the road that goes to my son’s place.

The first spring was different from what I was used to.

The Kowhai Trees all are covered in yellow blooms.

Some streets have rows of them and when in bloom it is just beautiful to see.

Kōwhai are small, woody legume trees in the genus Sophora native to New Zealand. There are eight species, Sophora microphylla andS. tetraptera being the most recognised as large trees. Their natural habitat is beside streams and on the edges of forest, in lowland or mountain open areas.[1] Kōwhai trees grow throughout the country and are a common feature in New Zealand gardens. Outside of New Zealand, kōwhai tend to be restricted to mild temperate maritime climates.

The name kōwhai comes from the Māori word for yellow—a reference to the colour of the flower.[2] The name is usually spelled as kōwhai but frequently without the macron, and is sometimes spelled kōhai in some areas.

Despite having no official status as such,[3] the blooms of the kōwhai are widely regarded as being New Zealand’s national flower.[4

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C5%8Dwhai

Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge : Day 2 Naboomspruit/Mookgophong


The rules of Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge require you to post a photo each day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo (It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or simply a short paragraph) and then nominate another blogger to carry on this challenge. Accepting the challenge is entirely up to the person nominated, it is not a command.

I would like to invite anybody who is interested to join the Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge.

Here is my second photo/story…

5 fotos, 5 stories uitdaging :  Dag 2

NABOOMSPRUIT/MOOKGOPHONG 

Springbokvlakte, Nylsvley
Springbokvlakte, Nylsvley

Naboom is die dorp wat meer suid van Potgietersrus lê oppad na Pretoria toe. My oudste suster het jare daar gebly.Sy is nou woonagtig in Pretoria.

Ek het baie naweke Sondagoggende by haar gaan kuier. Ons het altyd heerlik in haar lapa gesit en teedrink en n hond uit n bos gekuier.

Die foto is geneem van bo van die Waterberge tussen Naboom en Nylstoorm.

Van bo af kyk n mens op die Springbokvlakte en Nylsvley. Mens kan amper sê die vlakte is so groot soos die Heer se Genade as mens daar bo staan.

Die boom wat in voorgrond is, is n Naboom.

Naboom  :  http://af.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naboom

Die Naboom (Euphorbia ingens) is ‘n kaktus-agtige boom met ‘n kort dik stam en enorme takke. Die boom kom in Limpopo voor en die naam van die dorp Naboomspruit verwys na hul aanwesigheid daar. Die takke het gewoonlik vier of vyf vlerke. Dit het ‘n taai, wit, melkagtige sap wat uiters giftig is en intense irritasie en blase op die vel veroorsaak. As dit in die oë beland kan dit permanente blindheid tot gevolg hê.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia_ingens

Euphorbia ingens is a species of plant in the genus Euphorbia and the family Euphorbiaceae. It is native to dry areas of southern Africa. It is popularly known as the “Candelabra Tree”, and its milky latex can be extremely poisonous, and a dangerous irritant.[2]

Springbokvlakte / Springbok Flats

The Springbok Flats is an extensive plain situated in Limpopo, South Africa. The southern boundary is the Pienaars river which intersects the N1 main road between Pretoria and Polokwane. To the west it includes the towns of Bela-Bela, Modimolle, Mookgophongand Mokopane. Towards the east it includes the towns Roedtan, Crecy, Marolong, Nutfield, Tuinplaas and Settlers. The 80 km wide and 130 km long swath of land is orientated in a northeasterly direction and is centered on Roedtan.

Subsequent to the Boer War the area became accessible as a farming region. Grasslands made way for crop fields or became covered in acacia scrub. Large areas are currently under crop cultivation, including wheat, maize, cotton, sorghum, peanuts and sunflowers. Irrigated citrus orchards have been established. Several game farms have to some measure reestablished the game diversity that existed here at the end of the 19th century.

The plain which is exceptionally flat and situated at an altitude of 1,000m above sea level, is subject to warm summers (shielded from cold winds by surrounding uplands) and dry winters. An annual rainfall of about 620 mm is the norm. Its vertisols are considered very fertile.

Coal and uranium reserves are to be found in its sediments

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springbok_Flats

Nylsvley

Nylsvley Nature Reserve is a 40 km2 (15 sq mi) protected area, lying on the seasonally-inundated floodplain of the Nyl River, the uppermost section of the Mogalakwena River which has a very shallow gradient. It is located near Mookgophong in theLimpopo Province of South Africa. This area has been declared a Ramsar wetland site because of its international conservation importance. The floodplain is made up of extensive reedbeds and grassveld surrounded by open woodland.

Situated in the upper catchment area of the Nyl River, and covering about 20% of the floodplain, the area boasts some 370 bird species – of which more than 100 are waterfowl – and during peak floods, over 80,000 birds are to be seen. The reserve is also home to roan antelope and tsessebe. The only stands of wild rice in South Africa, Oryza longistaminata, are to be found here.

The name ‘Nylsvley’ originated in vlei, a pan or seasonally flooded area, and in the word for “Nile”. In the 1860s, a Voortrekkergroup of farmers saw a large flooded plain and a river flowing northwards and thought it might be the Nylrivier (Nile river).[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nylsvley_Nature_Reserve

Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge: Day 1 Potgietersrus/ Mokopane


Two bloggers, nowathome –   https://nowathome.wordpress.com/

and  Far Out of Africa   – https://illgiveyoualetterforthat.wordpress.com/

invited me to participate in this challenge. Thank you both of you I accept the nomination. I am going to do two 5 day sessions. One on the last days in South Africa and the other on my first days here in New Zealand.

THE RULES of Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge require you to post a photo each day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo (It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or simply a short paragraph) and then nominate another blogger to carry on this challenge. Accepting the challenge is entirely up to the person nominated, it is not a command.

I would like to invite anyone to join the Five Photos, Five Stories Challenge. It is a lovely way to do 5 days of blogging.

Here is my first photo/story…

5 FOTOS, 5 STORIE UITDAGING   Dag 1

Potgietersrus/Mokopane Suid Afrika(2007-2009)

My eerse foto is vanaf my gehuurde tuinhuis se stoepie geneem. Ek het vir twee jaar hier gebly voordat ek na New Zealand verhuis het. Elke lente het die bome in die gesamentlike tuin geblom asof hul nooit weer die kans sal kry nie.

Rooi  Jakaranda
Rooi Jakaranda

Dis n Flamboyant boom

Wikkie gee die vogende beskrywing.

Delonix regia is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae. It is noted for its fern-like leaves and flamboyant display of flowers. In many tropical parts of the world it is grown as an ornamental tree and in English it is given the nameRoyal Poinciana or Flamboyant. It is also one of several trees known as Flame tree.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delonix_regia

Van naderby. Pragtig nê!
Van naderby. Pragtig nê!