NaNoWriMo 2018: starts November 1


I am excited! I have decided to participate in writing 50 000 words in thirty days this November.

I’m going to write in my mother tongue to make it easier to write faster and more because to write 50 000 words in 30 days each day needs at least 1 666 words per day!

What is it about?

The follow up of  JUST ME: A MEMOIR. Part one was about my life as a child growing up in the Netherlands until my sixth year.

I’m writing Part two about; starting my schooling in South Africa, studying as a teacher, and starting my teaching career in late 1960.

Reblogged the following from:

https://www.shewrites.com/blog/view/2849759/nanowrimo-season-is-upon-us-how-will-you-succeed

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month and it takes place every November.

Anyone can do it. You can sign up on the website (you don’t have to). You can go to events in your region (you don’t have to). You can donate for fabulous swag (you should probably do that one; they’re a fabulous non-profit).

But really all you have to do is write 1666 words a day for 30 days starting November 1 and ending November 30th, which leaves you with 50,000 words. A novel in a month.

That’s it.

Simple? Yes. Easy? Uh, no.

But here are five easy tips you can implement now in October if you are considering tackling this generative writing goal.

1. Just write. Don’t edit. Don’t research. Don’t fact-check. Just write.

NaNoWriMo is about getting words down on paper (or in Word, Pages, Scrivener, whatever). It’s about creating the raw material. I know. It’s hard to rush past imperfect sentences that could be crafted beautifully but you can do that later. In December.

2. Give something up.

Unless you already have a daily writing practice, you’ll have to find the time to write. It’s stupidly simple to say and ridiculously difficult to implement. This is NOVEMBER, after all. The verge of the holiday season, end-of-year mayhem and all that stuff.

With that in mind, before you mark off time in your calendar to write, clear it. Find something to sacrifice. Maybe you won’t clean the house in November (that’s what J.K. Rowling did when she was a single mom writing Harry Potter). Or you won’t watch Netflix. Perhaps you’ll get off Facebook for an entire month or wake up an hour earlier. If email is a big time-suck for you, consider setting up an auto-response letting people know you will be slow to respond to their email during November and then only check your email once a day.

It’s your call, but figure it out before November starts.

What do you need to give up to open up your schedule?

3. Decide when you will write.

Now that you have cleared your calendar a bit, mark your writing time. Early morning? After everyone else is in bed? Maybe you’ll write in the car instead of watch your kid’s soccer practice. Ideally, there’s a consistency to your writing practice but because this is a binge-write, it doesn’t matter as much as just getting it done. Carve out time whenever it works for you so you can get your butt in the chair and write.

4. Pick a daily reward system.

It’s amazing how a little reward can motivate you to meet your daily quota. The NaNoWriMo website is great for this. You get virtual stickers for meeting your targets and other little perks and congratulatory accolades along the way. But if you don’t want create an account on the website or if you are creating your own word counts, you can invent your own reward system. It should be something cumulative and visual—a reward/progress bar as simple as X’s on a calendar or post-its marking your daily word count will do the trick.

5. Visualize your writing routine

Picture it.

You: in your writing spot (the library? Fave café? Home office that is actually the dining room table?) Is it dark out because it’s so early? (or so late.) Take a moment to check off all the distractions that you’ve eliminated: you’ve shut off your phone, turned off Wi-Fi, shut the door or whatever else you have to do to block out the outside world.

There you are. In your happy writing place, happily writing. And when you’re done, you get your reward. An X, or upload your words to your NaNo profile, whatever it is.

Can you see it? That’s you! Writing, succeeding. Getting sh*t done.

Janine Kovac is the co-founder of Moxie Road Productions. She teaches writing workshops, including the month-long accountability workshop Finishing School course, which is specifically designed to outline a project and get it done in one calendar month. For more info on Janine, Moxie Road, or Finishing School, check out her website:http://moxieroad.com

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Bringing back sweet memories


Don Williams was never my favourite but his songs bring back nostalgic memories from days of being in love with my husband before we got married and during the first years after our marriage.

 

 

 

 

Coffee black, cigarettes
Start this day, like all the rest
First thing every morning that I do
Is start missing you

Some broken hearts never mend
Some memories never end
Some tears will never dry
My love for you will never die

Rendezvous in the night
A willing woman to hold me tight
But in the middle of love’s embrace
I see your face

Some broken hearts never mend
Some memories never end
Some tears will never dry
My love for you will never die

 

Skryf-Safarie – Trek jou stapskoene aan.


https://travel4601.wordpress.com/2018/05/03/skryf-safari-trek-jou-stapskoene-aan/

Bale Drome vra dat ons stapskoene aantrek en wys waarheen die stap lei.

2006

Die jaar 2006 het baie draaie met my geloop. Alles het begin met-

My besoek aan Bertus, my seun, wat in 2005 na Nieu Zealand getrek het. Net met sy tas is hy weg uit Suid Afrika om nie weer terug te gaan nie.

Ek het die geleentheid gehad om in 2006 in Nieu Zealand te gaan kuier en uit te vind hoe die lewe daar is. Ook om natuurlik te gaan kyk hoe dit met my kind gaan!

1 Februarie 2006

Jan Smuts Lughawe- Oliver thambo vandag

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Daar gaat ek.

Na 18 ure se vlieg land die vliegtuig in Sydney, Australië. Dan twee ure se wag vir aansluiting na Wellington, Nieu Zealand se hoofstad. Ek land net voor twaalf die aand.

Die volgende oggend was ek gedaan!

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Wellington met sy hawe, The Bee Hive – parlementsgebou, Te Papa – “ons huis” museum,  en heuwels.

Ons gaan kuier by Stella, nou Bertus se vrou

se ouers in Cambridge.

Dit is n agt ure se ry vanaf Wellington tot in Cambridge.

Ons stop

Kapiti kus en Kapiti Eiland.

Foxton omtrent 170 km verder-

De Molen

wat steeds koring maal vir broodbak.

Ook n geskiedkundige vlas fabriek waar

toue gemaak word.

Taupo meer.

Karapiri meer naby Hamelton.

The Castle.

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Welbekende Huka Waterval.

Sommer nog baie mooi dinge.

Braai n vleisie!

Nie kole nie!

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Klink n laaste glasie voordat ek die nag terug vlieg.

Daar gaat ek weer terug.

Wellington, Sydney en Johannesburg.

Ek kan steeds nie glo dat ek in so n pragtige land bly nie. Van hierdie besoek af het daar nog baie reise plaasgevind.

Hoop almal het die stukkie land geniet. Tot n volgende keer!

Hierdie week se uitdaging word aangebied deur  travel460 van die blog Bali Drome. Die uitdaging open om 12:00 op Donderdag 3 Mei.

Om die inskrywings van verskillende bloggers in die Lê-Jou-Eier uitdaging te geniet of om self ‘n blog wat jy geskryf het aan te heg by hierdie skakel, klik op die InLinkz skakel net onder die paddatjie:

http://www.inlinkz.com/new/view.php?id=778471

Vir die reëls van hierdie uitdaging, om raad te kry oor hoe om deel te neem en om elke week se aankondiging van die nuwe onderwerp te sien, besoek die volgende skakel by Dis Ekke. Onder hierdie kategorie, kyk na die blogposts Lê-Jou-Eier: Reëls (2017-08-22) en Lê-Jou-Eier: Hoe neem ek deel? (2017-08-22).

Memoirs: Teaching Snippets


Image result for classroom pictures cartoon

Forty years of teaching experience gives me a lot to reminisce about school, children, parents, teaching and teachers.

I was never cut out to be a teacher. Never liked teaching much too. But I, as a dedicated person, learned to give my best while working with children.

The best of my teaching time was when I taught English second language, history and technology at High School Secunda. I had year eight, nine and ten. Teenagers are difficult years. I usually had the average and below average students classes. The lessons had to be as colourful and well planned as could be so that they could participate naturally.

Those eight years at high school were trying years in South Africa. Secunda with  Sasol II and III was a danger zone for bomb attacks. The year twelve boys had to protect the school and patrolled the verandas around the classrooms. Guns were ready in the vault for in case. We also had regularly emergency evacuations.

We, as teachers, also trained to use a firearm. We had shooting exercises to make sure that we were prepared. We had to use our firearm for protection. It’s a big responsibility to protect children and keep them safe.

I usually had the slower children in my register class. Most of the time I had to be a mother, father and friend to these troubled children.

Image result for classroom pictures cartoon

One year I had a girls class. One of the girls was sent to a reform school. Her home environment was terrible. She was a real rebel and using drugs. I filled reports and forms on her behaviour which was a huge task. I know that she was rehabilitated at the end and wrote her matric. I was glad that she did well. The worst was that, the first day she was free to face life outside the school, a car killed her while crossing the street.

Image result for classroom pictures cartoon

Another year I had a boys class. They were a handful a real rough bunch. However, we playfully tackled the day’s work. There were twins, both in the same class. They were ten brothers and sisters, all equally rough. They were, however, a close family and well-mannered. After a year out of school, I met one of the twins at the shops. He was so happy to see me. His first words: “I was released from prison yesterday.I’m never going to lose my temper again.I want to be a good father to my child and husband to my wife.” It is sad that children who are inner good, land in situations that get out of control. Another boy one day shouted from the back of the room: “I won’t take out my book.”  I took him to the principal who gave him a proper reprimand. In the end, he was a grateful child who passed his year. He realised he had to do his work to achieve something. He bought me a coke and thanked me for helping him to stay on the right path. These small tokens of appreciation of educating children made it worth the while. I mostly had to do a lot of incentives work to convince them that, with hard work and pressure, life is worth it.

Image result for classroom pictures cartoon

These are a few snippets from my teaching journey.

All done: My book is live now.


My book is on the market as an eBook and paperback.

Paperback link:

https://www.amazon.com/Just-Me-Memoir-African-Zealand/dp/1978228155/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1517350723&sr=1-1

I hope you will enjoy reading about a young girl migrating from the Netherlands to South Africa. This book is about the first six years of my life.

The second volume will be About me growing up in South Africa during the early 1950s up to where I started my first teaching job late 1960s.

Gift – Train of Thoughts: Week 05


Visit NiTinairwrites  For rules

https://www.nitinnairwrites.com/2017/12/30/gift-train-of-thoughts-week-05/

GIFT

Childhood Gift

I still remember my best childhood gift. A sleeping doll with a soft green dress!

She was so beautiful I could not keep my eyes from her. When I held her in my arms, like a baby, she would close her eyes. Then when I kept her upright, she would look at me with bright blue glassy doll’s eyes. She also had long curly golden nylon hair.

In 1952 my family moved to South Africa from the Netherlands. It was at the beginning of February when the journey started. My 6th birthday was going to be on the ship!

Next door to our home lived two sisters who, to me as a nearly six-year-old, looked very old. They were friends of my parents. A day before our departure they came over and told me that they had a present for me because they won’t see me on my birthday later in February.  I opened my present,  and guess what? In the box, all dressed up was this most beautiful doll.  Her body was soft, and her head, hands and parts of her legs were made from porcelain. Her face was beautifully painted and then those glassy blue eyes! I will never forget her eyes. She even had on some white shoes and socks.

I loved this doll so much. I never liked to give it to my sisters to play with. A year or two later one of my sisters played with it outside. She forgot to bring it in and the early morning dew ruined my lovely doll’s face. She was never the beauty again.