NaNoWriMO: I did it. Ek het dit gedoen.


Congratulations, winner!

You are a writer with a love for stories. You are an explorer of creative universes. You are a hero with the superpower of imagination. You are the beating heart of NaNoWriMo, and we’re so proud to write with you and doubly proud of your incredible accomplishment.

Congratulations, Writer! You wear the title well.

2018 Winner Certificate

 

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NaNoWriMo: Nearly there; Amper daar


I made 40 000 words + 987 words just now. Just 9 000 to go.

NaNoWriMoYou’ve written 40,000 words of your novel—congratulations! You’re in the home stretch.

You’ve written 40,000 words. You’ve proven that your determination gets it done. Your hair is looking great today. You are amazing.

Now your victory is only 10,000 words away.

======================

Ek het dit gemaak tot by 40 000 woorde. Nou die laaste draai voordat ek die eindpunt bereik.

Ek het die laaste stukke geskryf oor my ervarings met diere wat ek al beleef het, daarna het ek die vriende in my lewe opgediep. Daar is nog baie wat ek by die skrywe kan byvoeg.

My volgende dele gaan oor my gesondheid, voertuie, musiek en kreatiwiteite. Dan is daar die laaste deel wat ek dalk nou eers gaan skryf en dit gaan oor geloof in my lewe.

Joega!  Ek is bly ek het sover goed geskryf.

NaNoWriMo: Skryf in Afrikaans


National Novel Writing Month

Uitnodiging

Op die oomblik voel ek heel opgewonde. Ek het ‘n perd opgesaal wat my hopelik nie gaan afgooi nie. Meeste van julle weet ek is nie ‘n perde mens nie.
Hierdie jaar het ek besluit om deel te neem aan die wêreldwye “skryf ‘n boek in dertig dae” uitdaging. Ek gaan dit in Afrikaans doen omdat dit my moedertaal is. Die Engels kom nie natuurlik genoeg om 1666 woorde te skryf per dag, en dit vir dertig dae, of totdat daar 50 000 woorde geskryf is.
Dit gaan nie oor om die boek klaar te skryf nie. Dit gaan daaroor om in ‘n skryf ritme te kom. Mens mag nie verbeteringe maak nie(edit nie). Jy gaan sit net, en skryf alles wat in jou gedagte kom wat by jou storie pas.
Ek het die afgelope maand my voorbereiding gedoen en wag nou in spanning om Donderdag te begin skryf.
My Titel: Net ek: ‘n Memoir(deel twee)
My onderwerp: My eie skooljare, opleiding en beginjare van my skoolhou loopbaan.

Nadat ek die bekendmaking gemaak het in my vorige skrywe was daar wraggies reaksie op my aankondiging. Lekkervurigeaffêre gaan deelneem en  Cecilia Lombard gaan ook saamskryf. Ons drie het klaar ingeteken om Buddies te wees. Ons gaan mekaar ondersteun totadat die wenpaal bereik is.

As daar nog ouens van julle is wat belangstel; Kom saam en skryf saam. Dit gaan ‘n fees wees.
Hoe lyk dit  HesterLeyNel woordnoot,  Kameel en Lewies Mymer  ? Julle kan mos skryf!

Groetnis tot volgende keer.

NaNoWriMo 2018: starts November 1


I am excited! I have decided to participate in writing 50 000 words in thirty days this November.

I’m going to write in my mother tongue to make it easier to write faster and more because to write 50 000 words in 30 days each day needs at least 1 666 words per day!

What is it about?

The follow up of  JUST ME: A MEMOIR. Part one was about my life as a child growing up in the Netherlands until my sixth year.

I’m writing Part two about; starting my schooling in South Africa, studying as a teacher, and starting my teaching career in late 1960.

Reblogged the following from:

https://www.shewrites.com/blog/view/2849759/nanowrimo-season-is-upon-us-how-will-you-succeed

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month and it takes place every November.

Anyone can do it. You can sign up on the website (you don’t have to). You can go to events in your region (you don’t have to). You can donate for fabulous swag (you should probably do that one; they’re a fabulous non-profit).

But really all you have to do is write 1666 words a day for 30 days starting November 1 and ending November 30th, which leaves you with 50,000 words. A novel in a month.

That’s it.

Simple? Yes. Easy? Uh, no.

But here are five easy tips you can implement now in October if you are considering tackling this generative writing goal.

1. Just write. Don’t edit. Don’t research. Don’t fact-check. Just write.

NaNoWriMo is about getting words down on paper (or in Word, Pages, Scrivener, whatever). It’s about creating the raw material. I know. It’s hard to rush past imperfect sentences that could be crafted beautifully but you can do that later. In December.

2. Give something up.

Unless you already have a daily writing practice, you’ll have to find the time to write. It’s stupidly simple to say and ridiculously difficult to implement. This is NOVEMBER, after all. The verge of the holiday season, end-of-year mayhem and all that stuff.

With that in mind, before you mark off time in your calendar to write, clear it. Find something to sacrifice. Maybe you won’t clean the house in November (that’s what J.K. Rowling did when she was a single mom writing Harry Potter). Or you won’t watch Netflix. Perhaps you’ll get off Facebook for an entire month or wake up an hour earlier. If email is a big time-suck for you, consider setting up an auto-response letting people know you will be slow to respond to their email during November and then only check your email once a day.

It’s your call, but figure it out before November starts.

What do you need to give up to open up your schedule?

3. Decide when you will write.

Now that you have cleared your calendar a bit, mark your writing time. Early morning? After everyone else is in bed? Maybe you’ll write in the car instead of watch your kid’s soccer practice. Ideally, there’s a consistency to your writing practice but because this is a binge-write, it doesn’t matter as much as just getting it done. Carve out time whenever it works for you so you can get your butt in the chair and write.

4. Pick a daily reward system.

It’s amazing how a little reward can motivate you to meet your daily quota. The NaNoWriMo website is great for this. You get virtual stickers for meeting your targets and other little perks and congratulatory accolades along the way. But if you don’t want create an account on the website or if you are creating your own word counts, you can invent your own reward system. It should be something cumulative and visual—a reward/progress bar as simple as X’s on a calendar or post-its marking your daily word count will do the trick.

5. Visualize your writing routine

Picture it.

You: in your writing spot (the library? Fave café? Home office that is actually the dining room table?) Is it dark out because it’s so early? (or so late.) Take a moment to check off all the distractions that you’ve eliminated: you’ve shut off your phone, turned off Wi-Fi, shut the door or whatever else you have to do to block out the outside world.

There you are. In your happy writing place, happily writing. And when you’re done, you get your reward. An X, or upload your words to your NaNo profile, whatever it is.

Can you see it? That’s you! Writing, succeeding. Getting sh*t done.

Janine Kovac is the co-founder of Moxie Road Productions. She teaches writing workshops, including the month-long accountability workshop Finishing School course, which is specifically designed to outline a project and get it done in one calendar month. For more info on Janine, Moxie Road, or Finishing School, check out her website:http://moxieroad.com

Last week reminder September: A & I Poetry Challenge: Limerick


 

Just a reminder that September Poetry contributions close next weekend, September 30.

This month we wrote some Limericks on seasons.

Please post your limerick on your blog, linking your URL to Ineke or Amanda’s blogs to get included in the September roundup and also for other bloggers to read.

For more information on how to participate click Here

Host bloggers are, Amanda   from Australia at

https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2018/09/02/poetry-challenge-september-prompt/

and Ineke from New Zealand at

https://scrapydo2.wordpress.com/2018/09/22/a-i-poetry-challenge-limerick/

 jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets.

The Challenge runs from March to October 2018.

October is the last one for this year. Amanda will put the October Challenge up in the first week of October.

A and I Poetry Challenge

School Stories: Completed books with own stories


After six weeks of writing stories during the school’s Enrichment periods, each child had a book as an end product. The ages of the writers ranged between eight and ten.

The students thoroughly enjoyed writing the stories.

20180903_144131
Hard at work, writing stories.
20180916_114203
Eleven manuscripts.
20180917_142222
Proud writers.( The twins were absent)

Children writing stories 1: Two stories from Daisy


 

Image result for cats running

LOST, AND FINDING HOME AGAIN.

Pepper woke up at 3 am bright and ready for a new adventure. She gave herself a good clean and darted out the cat flap.

She ran through the bush out on the neighbour’s driveway. Practices some stalking the chickens. She won’t hurt them!

After this fun, she spent so time running around smelling everything.

Suddenly Pepper stopped. She smelled something dangerous. Some warm breath brushed against her face. Pepper took off in a flash. A bark echoed behind her. “A dog! I’ve got to run faster!” She kept on running. The dog gave up, and Pepper headed home.

“Where am I?” she could see nothing familiar. She knew that she ran straight. “Think Pepper!” she told herself. “I just need to run in the opposite direction.”She sped for home. After running for a long time, she passed a well-known tree. She smelled a familiar smell. She heard biscuits being poured into her bowl. Pepper followed the scent and the sound and padded down the driveway. She looked up and saw her home.

Hurriedly she ran inside. A welcome smile and beaming face looked at her.

That was an unforgettable adventure.

Pepper enjoyed the rest of the day resting and cuddled up in her owner’s arms.

Second Story

AROUND THE WORLD

Image result for leaf drawings in pencil

Hi, I’m a colourful leaf. I live in Willow Woods. Very boring just hanging here unless the wind blows. It has been my dream to travel around the world.

One day a storm was brewing overhead. My hopes got up:

Maybe my luck is in today!

The storm could go on for days, and I could travel around the world! Jippie yey.

Now, wait for the moment! I got prepared for the journey by packing a lot of nutrients and a protective dirt suit so that I won’t get ripped apart.

The wind began to pick up speed. I whisked around. After some hours I was out of the country.

I flew over the sea. The sea was more beautiful than I imagined. My first stop was Italy. Finally, my dream came true.

 

To be continued.

Children writing stories. Introduction.


Writing Clip Art

 

Each year Plateau School has for six weeks, one hour per week, an Enrichment period.

The sessions stretch from knitting, building robots, web pages, photography, painting, bush walks, designing, reading maps and whatever is different from the real school periods. Volunteers(mostly parents) show or help children to do things they have never tried before. Each child had to decide which session they would attend.

The sessions are the last hour of the day, on Mondays this year.

I volunteered to help them to write their own stories.

Eleven children are attending my sessions. Two boys and nine girls. They are in year four and five.

We started two weeks ago.

The first period was just an introduction to what they could expect.

I want them to write at least three stories. Then I’m going to help them to put it in a book with a cover, front page, content and maybe an introduction.

writing clipart

  1. We started off by brainstorming the ideas what they are going to write about
  2. Then the first sentence or paragraph to hook the reader into the story.
  3. Next is the body or what happened.
  4. Last paragraph, the ending where the story is rounded off.

The second period was the past week. I explained to them that writing a story is like making a sandwich. They had to tell me what they would need for the sandwich.

The top slice is the sentence in which they explain who is in the story and also to hook the reader in by just giving away a little bit of the story

The yummy middle part is where all the deliciousness lies. All the action of the story and then the bottom slice is where the main character wins the battle or is saved.

I am going to edit the stories just a little bit so that the pieces make sense. I received my first stories and am astounded by how good they are.  I’m also going to put some stories on my blog to show how good they are.

Clip Art

At the end of the six weeks, I want to publish a book with all their stories in it. It could be a good Christmas present at the end of the year.

 

A & I Poetry Challenge: Reminder


I reblogged the information from  https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2018/07/22/poetry-challenge-for-july-closing-soon/

Poetry Challenge for July closing soon

A and I Poetry Challenge

Time is running out if you wish to join in for the month of July in the A and I Bilingual Poetry Challenge (running each month until October).  Linkbacks to contributors will be posted next week. Leave a comment here, and tag your post as per instructions, to be included in the July roundup.

The prompt for July is:

Turn on the radio to any channel.

Write a poem inspired by the first thing you hear

(lyrics to a song, a commercial, etc.)

For the Afrikaans version of the Poetry Challenge, please visit Ineke at  scrapydo2.wordpress.com

Full instructions on joining in with the Poetry Challenge, look here

 

A & I Poetry Challenge: July 2018


Our July Challenge:

Turn on the radio to any channel.

Write a poem inspired by the first thing you hear (lyrics to a song, a commercial, etc.)

Post it to your blog, prior to July 26, and include the Tag A and I Poetry Challengeso that Amanda and I, (the hosts) can find your poem and comment.

Leave a comment on this post to indicate your interest in participation.

The A and I Poetry Writing Challenge has been running for several months and the poetic community grows each month.

(Click Here for a sample) 

When formulating your poem, please keep in Mind:

The prompt is merely a suggestion if you need help getting started with ideas.

You may, write about whatever you choose and still tag our A and I Poetry Challenge so that other readers can find your poetry post.

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

A and I Poetry Challenge Instructions  HERE

Read my Submission in my follow up post, tomorrow, together with links to the Poetry participants from the month of June, but first here are some Poetry Writing Tips:

Poetry Writing Tips from Allison

  •  Don’t overdo prepositions, adjectives, and adverbs.
  •  Use action verbs, not “to be” verbs
  •  Help the reader interact with the poem.
  •  Help the reader relate by focusing on particular objects, not generalizing a type of object (whether the object is physical, mental, or spiritual).
  •  Find unusual subject matter — a teapot, a shelf, a wall
  •   Keep a notebook with you at all times so you can write whenever (and wherever) inspiration strikes.
  • Sometimes it is a scratching secret, wanting out, wanting to be in the world but held back by fear. Either way there is something about the act of sharing with the world, however big or small that world might be, that completes the creative process.
  • If you want to capture a feeling that you experienced, then you don’t need these tips. Just write whatever feels right. Only you experienced the feeling that you want to express, so only you will know whether your poem succeeds.

Happy writing

Ineke